SANS Digital Forensics and Incident Response Blog: Author - Chad Tilbury

Big Brother Forensics: Device Tracking Using Browser-Based Artifacts (Part 1)

[Author's Note: Geo-location artifacts have been a frequent focus of my research, and I am amazed at how quickly they are permeating operating systems, applications and file formats.In the fall of 2011 I had the pleasure of writing an article for Digital Forensics Magazine focused on browser-based geo artifacts, where much of this series was … Continue reading Big Brother Forensics: Device Tracking Using Browser-Based Artifacts (Part 1)


NTFS $I30 Index Attributes: Evidence of Deleted and Overwritten Files

Daunting as it may seem, one of the most wonderful aspects of Windows forensics is its complexity. One of the fascinating aspects of digital forensics is how we often leverage conventional operating system features to provide information peripheral to their original design. One such feature is the Windows NTFS Index Attribute, also known as the … Continue reading NTFS $I30 Index Attributes: Evidence of Deleted and Overwritten Files


Live Memory Forensic Analysis

As memory forensics has become better understood and more widely accomplished, tools have proliferated. More importantly, the capabilities of the tools have greatly improved. Traditionally, memory analysis has been the sole domain of Windows internals experts, but recent tools now make analysis feasible for the rank and file forensic examiner. Better interfaces, documentation, and built-in … Continue reading Live Memory Forensic Analysis


Computer Forensic Artifacts: Windows 7 Shellbags

As Windows Registry artifacts go, the "Shellbag" keys tend to be some of the more complicated artifacts we have to decipher. But they are worth the effort, giving an excellent means to prove the existence of files and folders along with user knowledge. Shellbags can be used to answer the difficult questions of data enumeration … Continue reading Computer Forensic Artifacts: Windows 7 Shellbags


Computer Forensics How-To: Microsoft Log Parser

As any incident responder will agree, you can never have too many logs. That is, of course, until you have to analyze them! I was recently on an engagement where our team had to review hundreds of gigabytes of logs looking for evidence of hacking activity. I was quickly reminded of how much I love … Continue reading Computer Forensics How-To: Microsoft Log Parser