SANS Digital Forensics and Incident Response Blog: Category - artifact analysis

SANS Digital Forensics and Incident Response Blog:

DFIR Summit 2016 - Call for Papers Now Open

The 9th annual Digital Forensics and Incident Response Summit will once again be held in the live musical capital of the world, Austin, Texas. The Summit brings together DFIR practitioners who share their experiences, case studies and stories from the field. Summit attendees will explore real-world applications of technologies and solutions from all aspects of … Continue reading DFIR Summit 2016 - Call for Papers Now Open

Using ProcDOT Plugins to Examine PCAP Files When Analyzing Malware

ProcDOT is a free tool for analyzing the actions taken by malware when infecting a laboratory system. ProcDOT supports plugins, which could extend the tool's built-in capabilities. This article looks at two plugins that help examine contents of the network capture file loaded into ProcDOT.

Timeline analysis with Apache Spark and Python

This blog post introduces a technique for timeline analysis that mixes a bit of data science and domain-specific knowledge (file-systems, DFIR). Analyzing CSV formatted timelines by loading them with Excel or any other spreadsheet application can be inefficient, even impossible at times. It all depends on the size of the timelines and how many different … Continue reading Timeline analysis with Apache Spark and Python

A Threat Intelligence Script for Qualitative Analysis of Passwords Artifacts

The Verizon Data Breach Report has consistently said, over the years, passwords are a big part of breach compromises. Dr. Lori Cranor, and her team, at CMU has done extensive research on how to choose the best password policies verses usability. In addition, Alison Nixon's research describes techniques to determine valid password of an organization … Continue reading A Threat Intelligence Script for Qualitative Analysis of Passwords Artifacts

How Miscreants Hide From Browser Forensics

Scammers, intruders and other miscreants often aim to conceal their actions from forensic investigators. When analyzing an IT support scam, I interacted with the person posing as the help desk technician. He brought up a web page on the victim's system to present payment form, so the person would supply contact and credit card details. He did this in a surprising manner, designed to conceal the destination URL.