SANS Digital Forensics and Incident Response Blog: Category - Browser Forensics

Quick Look - Cellebrite UFED Using Extract Phone Data & File System Dump

It is not the intent of this blog post to be an all-encompassing guide to the forensic analysis of an iPhone. Rather it is a look at some of the tools I use in my practice and how they can be applied to iPhone forensic analysis. That being said lets get to it.

Why would you use the Cellebrite File System Dump instead of the traditional Extract Phone Data ?

If the subject of your forensic analysis is collecting information regarding the telephone such as call logs, phone book, SMS, pictures, video and audio/music then you will find what you need using the standard Cellebrite processing found under "Extract Phone Data". However if you want to do a deep dive in to the file structure, Internet usage or look deep in to the applications that are being used on the device and perhaps run some of your "favorite forensic tools" against it, I highly recommend complimenting your traditional

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Digital Forensics: Too Much Porn, Too Little Time

I recently had a case where one of the requirements was to determine if the PC had been used to view and or download pornographic images from the Internet. First let me say that in my view the only party that can ultimately determine if an image is pornographic is the court. That being said we agreed in the onset of the investigation that any image that clearly showed sexual organs would be the definition we would use in determining if a particular image met the client's definition of a pornographic image.

Processing the case with FTK 3.12 and both collecting images in allocated space as well as carving for images in unallocated space revealed well over 60,000 images. The client needed and answer quickly hence manually reviewing and classifying the large number of images was not an option. If you simply did a quick view of each image for just 5 seconds you would burn about 2 weeks of labor. The process needed to be automated and sooner than later. I had heard AccessData had

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Digital Forensics Case Leads: Does Forensicator Pro include a Hex Editor? and other tool tales

Well, it's been a quiet week at Lake DataBeGone, where all the forensicators are above average, or at least aspire to that. Nothing as exciting as DefCon/BlackHat this week, but we do have a few things....

Good Reads:

  • The new issue of Digital Forensics Magazine is out, and includes not only an article by Rob Lee on what it takes to become a computer forensics pro, as mentioned last week, but also an article on real time network forensics, and a nice survey of law enforcement practices around the world, written by Christa Miller. If you don't subscribe already, you should - go to http://www.digitalforensicsmagazine.com/ and sign up!
  • Selena Ley has a brief overview article on Safari artifacts that should be consideredin

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Internet Evidence Finder Part II: Intro to IEF v3.3

I had an opportunity earlier this year to interview Jad Saliba of JadSoftware.com discussing his Internet Evidence Finder tool. You can view that interview here. Hopefully, SANS Computer Forensic Blog readers enjoyed the 15% discount that Jad offered exclusively to SANS CF blog readers and have taken the time to implement this tool into your forensic toolkit. This post is part of a series and will introduce functionality of IEF v3.3. You can download the most recent version (v3.5.1 at time of this article) from JadSoftware.com.Just a brief recap of what IEF will search for on a mounted drive/folder. Facebook chat, Yahoo! chat (IEF must have chat username to decode), Windows Live Messenger chat, Google Talk chat, AIM logs, hotmail webmail fragments, yahoo! webmail fragments, etc. For a full listing of supported artifacts and limitations visit

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Digital Forensics Case Leads: SQLite changes may impact your processes

I don't know if it's the time of year, the heat or what, but there's been so much going on over the last couple weeks that this post almost didn't make it out. Gasp! Thanks to the efforts of Ira Victor and Mark McKinnon (yay crowd-sourcing), we pulled it off. Speaking of crowd-sourcing, this post is meant to be a weekly round-up of things we've found that may be of interest to digital forensics and incident response practitioners, as such, please drop us a line at caseleads@sans.org if you have an item that you feel should be included in the weekly post. We appreciate it.

Tools:

  • Paraben's P2 Explorer is a great little free tool that mounts a variety of popular disk image formats, allowing the investigator to easily run a variety of tools against the mounted file system (e.g. anti-virus/malware scans).
  • Digital

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