SANS Digital Forensics and Incident Response Blog: Category - Computer Forensics

Did Las Vegas Police Fumble Critical Digital Forensics in High Profile Shooting Case?

While in a re-certification class at SANS Network Security, a local news story catches my attention. It's a coroner's inquest into the death of Erik Scott, who was shot here in July outside a Costco store by officers of the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police (LVMP) after a store employee spotted Scott's firearm, which he had a permit to carry.

There's limited time while we drink from the SANS fire hose to absorb the day's news events. But I picked up the following from an op-ed piece by Scott's father in the Las Vegas Sun. The dead man's family is harshly critical the investigative process, and not without justification, if William Scott's account is accurate.

The elder Scott says the investigation has been entirely internal, conducted by LVMP. Scott is an aerospace journalist who notes that if an airline pilot has an accident that results in a

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Digital Forensics Case Leads: Stuxnet, Cyber Weapons and Incident Response

Our focus this week, albeit loosely, is on Incident Response. There has been much news of late regarding the Stuxnet malware, and a couple of the more interesting perspectives are linked in the "Good Reads" section below. As forensicators and incident responders, the advent of such "weapons-grade" malware raises the stakes significantly, and we have to step up our game to match. Memory forensics becomes far more crucial when dealing with advanced threats, and Mandiant offers some help in this area with an update to their Memoryze tool. But our ability to learn from the incidents we investigate and share that information also becomes vastly more important. To help us in this area, Verizon has provided their VERIS Framework, which is a tool for gathering metrics from incident investigations so that we can begin to share and learn from the breaches that inevitably occur. The VERIS Framework isn't all that new, but deserves more attention. So read on for these and other interesting

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Quick Look - Cellebrite UFED Using Extract Phone Data & File System Dump

It is not the intent of this blog post to be an all-encompassing guide to the forensic analysis of an iPhone. Rather it is a look at some of the tools I use in my practice and how they can be applied to iPhone forensic analysis. That being said lets get to it.

Why would you use the Cellebrite File System Dump instead of the traditional Extract Phone Data ?

If the subject of your forensic analysis is collecting information regarding the telephone such as call logs, phone book, SMS, pictures, video and audio/music then you will find what you need using the standard Cellebrite processing found under "Extract Phone Data". However if you want to do a deep dive in to the file structure, Internet usage or look deep in to the applications that are being used on the device and perhaps run some of your "favorite forensic tools" against it, I highly recommend complimenting your traditional

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You're a tool, a digital forensics tool.

A common question I am asked or see posted on forums, user groups and social media sites is: "What is the best computer forensic tool?" It is usually posed by someone getting started in the field and is an understandable query for an individual who is unfamiliar with some of the granular technical details of the field and looking for direction on how to get their feet wet. In addition there are considerable marketing efforts by product developers to set their solution apart from the rest claiming to be the best, fastest, most reliable or somehow "court approved." (Chris Pogue recently touched upon the "court-approved" tool fallacy on his blog http://thedigitalstandard.blogspot.com/2010/08/court-approved.html.)

When this question is posed I try impress upon the person asking it that there are no forensic tools. There are only

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Dealing with Split Raw Images in Digital Forensics

Hal Pomeranz, Deer Run Associates

Lately I've been working with images from a client whose policy is to create their dd type images as a series of 2GB chunks- the so-called split raw format. While commercial forensic tools will typically handle this format easily, split raw images can present challenges for examiners using Open Source utilities and Linux command-line tools. With image sizes constantly increasing, recombining the individual chunks of a split raw image into a single, monolithic image file is not really practical either in terms of analyst time or disk space. Happily, there are some Open Source utilities that can make dealing with split raw images considerably easier.

The Sleuth Kit

The Sleuth Kit utilities have actually supported split raw format since v2. The trick is to use the "-i split" option

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