SANS Digital Forensics and Incident Response Blog: Category - Computer Forensics

Digital Forensics Case Leads: Ann's Aurora Edition

We won! We won! We WON! Okay. Breathe. Now that I've gotten than out...

On behalf of all of the contributors to theSANS Computer Forensic Investigations and Incident Response Blog, I want to thank everyonewho voted for us asBest Digital Forensics Blog in this year's Forensic 4cast awards. We are all deeply grateful to know that our work is recognized and appreciated by our peers in the Security and Forensics professions. And we are also grateful for the community that continues to grow around this blog. The amount of feedback we've received from readers has increased in the past few months, and we thank you for helping to make this a lively and thought-provoking site to visit.

In keeping with that spirit,if you have an interesting item you think should be included in the Digital Forensics Case Leads posts, please

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Linux Programming Tools

Digital forensics practitioners, incident responders and *nix system administrators should be aware of programming tools that can aid attackers. It is simple for an attacker to load code when compilers or other tools are installed on a system. In this event, the attacker can simply add any tools that are desired by compiling them on the host. Source code can be uploaded over ASCII connections such as telnet, so even a console can be used to load one's favorite tools when compilers are installed.

In many cases, compilers and other similar tools have been restricted or (ideally) not installed on production systems. Where this is the case, it is still common to discover many related tools (including disassemblers) on a host. Some of these tools are covered in this section. These may allow an attacker to create and load code on a system, so when analysing a compromised host, you need to think beyond gcc and the common compilers.

In many instances, systems

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Forensic 4cast Award Results

Lee Whitfield of Forensic 4cast presented the 2nd annual Forensic 4cast awards last night at the SANS Forensics and Incident Response Summit. You can find the SANS webcast of the awards here. The actual awards were provided by the fine people at Disklabs. Thanks very much to Lee Whitfield and Disklabs for everything they did to bring the awards together!

Outstanding Contribution to Digital Forensics - Individual
Rob Lee

Outstanding Contribution to Digital Forensics - Company
SANS

Best Digital Forensics

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Digital Forensics Case Leads: Spies, Social Networking Experiments, Live CDs & More

This "007" edition of Case Leads (20100708) features Russian spies, a mini-write blocker that would make Q proud, an experiment in social networking, Live CDs for Windows and Linux and an online journal on small digital device forensics.

If you have an interesting item you think should be included in the Digital Forensics Case Leads posts, you can send it to caseleads@sans.org.

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People Searches

In the course of assisting corporations with their incident response activities, we are occasionally asked to help find information about employees that might reside on the internet. During a computer exam for an employee threats case, we found activity on Facebook, Twitter, and two different webmail accounts. We captured the public facing social media pages and included them as part of our exam report.

While this is nowhere near new territory, it may be useful to compile a quick hit list of websites to quickly and efficiently build a profile of an individual's social media and internet use. In our case, if the person of interest made public threats outside the business as well as the private threats that occurred inside the business, we needed to find them as quickly as possible and make sure we had them documented.

Here are some good places to start your search:

Social Media