SANS Digital Forensics and Incident Response Blog: Category - Computer Forensics

Sanitizing Media (The Linux Method)

Hal Pomeranz, Deer Run Associates

I've been wiping a lot of media lately. Mostly these are USB devices that we've used to share evidence and other data during an investigation. I want to be sure that I don't accidentally disclose any data from my cases, and I also want to know when I reach into my bag for a USB stick that it's not going to be polluted with other data. And when I get new media (from a vendor, trade show, or whatever) I always have a strict policy of wiping the drive completely from my Linux box (which is specifically configured not to automount new media) before it gets near any Windows machines that might have autoruns enabled.

Happily, Linux makes this whole process quite straightforward with just a few simple command-line tools.

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Autoruns and Dead Computer Forensics

Autoruns from Sysinternals is one of my favorite (free) tools. It has a myriad of uses, from optimizing the boot process to rooting out persistence mechanisms commonly used by malware. It is essentially a targeted registry dump, peering into at least a hundred different Windows Registry keys that the boot and logon processes rely upon. It very quickly shows what executables are set to run during boot or login, as well as enumerating many other interesting locations like Explorer shell extensions, browser helper objects, and toolbars. Over the years it has added some very useful features, including digital signature checks and the ability to ignore signed (and verified) Microsoft executables.

Until recently Autoruns had one big limitation: it had to be run on a live system. This is perfectly fine in a live response scenario when you are primarily working with systems that are up and running. However, in a dead computer forensics environment, its usefulness was hampered

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SANS Digital Forensics and IR Summit 2010: Advanced Persistent Threat Panel Questions Released!

The 2010 Digital Forensics and Incident Response Summit's focus this year is examining and advancing the digital forensic professional to deal with advanced threats such as the APT and organized crime. Understanding how many of these crimes take place is crucial to creating lethal forensicators armed with the knowledge and skills to analyze complex cases. REGISTER NOW!!

These questions are selected initially by the panelists to kick the panel off. Each panelist will choose one question initially and answer it. Once the initial questions are completed, additional questions will be taken from the attendees at the event.

Advanced Persistent Threat Panel Discussion

Panelists will discuss the Advanced Persistent Threat.

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Digital Forensics Case Leads: Certs and Books and Meetings - Oh My!

Tools

Good Reads:

  • Dominik Weber of Guidance Software has a very interesting writeup regarding acquisition of flash drives. The wear-leveling technology that is incorporated to extend the lifetime of flash devices can cause apparently random changes in hash values between acquisitions of the device, so it's important to take this into account. With the increasing popularity of SSD drives in computers, this will likely become increasingly important.

News:

  • Not to be outdone by Guidance Software's acquisition of Tableau, Access Data announced

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NDIFF for incident detection

A good way to see changes to the network is with a tool called ndiff.

Ndiff is a tool that utilizes nmap output to identify the differences, or changes that have occurred in your environment. Ndiff can be downloaded from http://www.vinecorp.com/ndiff/. The application requires that perl is installed in addition to nmap. The fundamental use of ndiff entails combining ndiff with a baseline file. This is achieved by using the "-b" option to select the file that is the baseline with the file to be tested using the "-o" option. The "-fmt" option selects the reporting format.

Ndiff can query the system's port states or even test for types of hosts and Operating Systems using the "-output-ports" or "-output-hosts" options.

The options offered in ndiff include:

ndiff [-b|-baseline ] [-o|-observed ]

[-op|-output-ports ] [-of|-output-hosts ]

... Continue reading NDIFF for incident detection