SANS Digital Forensics and Incident Response Blog: Category - Evidence Acquisition

Investigators: How to Write a Report and Store Digital Evidence

A wise investigator assumes an attitude of professionally skepticism. She recognizes that any piece of evidence may not be what it seems to be, and might in the future be interpreted in a different way or be refuted by other evidence.

Consider for example one of the most famous and thorough investigations in American history. The official investigation of the 1970 shooting of Kent State students by national guardsmen concluded that a certain Terry Norman (paid FBI informant) played no role in the shooting. However, forty years later a previously-unknown tape recording of the events has surfaced, and a forensic analysis of the recording shows that someone fired a .38-caliber pistol four times, shortly before the guardsmen opened fire. Norman was known to have brandished such a pistol at that place and time. It appears that

...


Digital Forensics Case Leads: Industrial Controls Forensics, Cracking Crackberries, Mobile Forensics

While most technical and non-technical types focus on servers, desktop, and mobile phones/pads when thinking about security and forensics, an area of growing concern is industrial controls security. This was brought to light in the wake of the Stuxnet worm. The accusations continue to fly, via arm-chair forensics. Was it an attack on Iran? Or maybe an attack against India, since it seems Stuxnet may have knocked out a TV Satellite. Security honcho Bruce Schnier says we may never know.

What is certain is a growing concern over industrial controls security. According to a San Francisco Chronicle story that ran on this week: "... Liam O Murchu, a researcher with the computer security firm Symantec, used a

...


Digital Forensics Case Leads: Free tools, Treasure Hunts, Drive-by Attacks and Spying

This week's Case Leads features two free tools from AccessData and Paraben Corporation, a digital (forensics) treasure hunt to test your skills, spying, drive-by (browser) attacks and consequences resulting from Stuxnet.

As always, if you have an interesting item you think should be included in the Digital Forensics Case Leads posts, you can send it to caseleads@sans.org.

Tools:

  • Earlier this month AccessData released a new version of their popular (and free) utility, the FTK Imager. Version 3 has a number of useful features such as the ability to boot forensic images in VMWare and the ability to mount AFF, DD, E01, and S01 image formats as physical devices or logical drive letters. The latest version of the application also supports HFS+, VxFS (Veritas File System), exFAT, EXT4, Microsoft's VHD (Virtual Hard Disk) and compressed and uncompressed DMG

...


Affidavit as Support for an Investigation

An affidavit can be a vital tool in any type of investigation, whether the investigation be forensic, internal, criminal, regulatory, incident response or otherwise. As an investigator gathers facts, he will often interview witnesses, and obviously the investigator is wise to make records of the interviews (written notes or even audio/video records). But sometimes it is prudent to take an additional step in securing what a witness has to say.

I recently advised an investigation where numerous witnesses had much to say. But as I assessed all that was being said, a particular statement of one certain witness stood out as crucial to the outcome of the case. I recommended that witness record her statement in an affidavit.

An affidavit is a formal, written document that memorializes a declaration of facts by a witness. The preparation and execution of an affidavit can help to lock down a complete and careful statement of what the witness has to say. An affidavit

... Continue reading Affidavit as Support for an Investigation


Images and dm-crypt and LVM2... Oh my!

Hal Pomeranz, Deer Run Associates

Disk layouts using the Linux Logical Volume Manager (LVM2) are increasingly becoming the norm for new Linux installs. And very often the physical volume used by LVM2 has been encrypted via dm-crypt. A recent email from a Sec508 student asking for a procedure for mounting these images prompted me to codify this information into a blog posting.

Investigating the Image

When initially presented with the image, you may not know whether LVM2 or dm-crypt has been employed. So let's start from scratch:

# md5sum sda.dd
f4c7a8d54b9b0b0b73ec03ef4cf52f42 sda.dd
# mmls -t dos sda.dd
DOS Partition Table
Offset Sector: 0
Units are in 512-byte sectors

Slot Start End Length Description
00: Meta

...