SANS Digital Forensics and Incident Response Blog: Category - Evidence Acquisition

Images and dm-crypt and LVM2... Oh my!

Hal Pomeranz, Deer Run Associates

Disk layouts using the Linux Logical Volume Manager (LVM2) are increasingly becoming the norm for new Linux installs. And very often the physical volume used by LVM2 has been encrypted via dm-crypt. A recent email from a Sec508 student asking for a procedure for mounting these images prompted me to codify this information into a blog posting.

Investigating the Image

When initially presented with the image, you may not know whether LVM2 or dm-crypt has been employed. So let's start from scratch:

# md5sum sda.dd
f4c7a8d54b9b0b0b73ec03ef4cf52f42 sda.dd
# mmls -t dos sda.dd
DOS Partition Table
Offset Sector: 0
Units are in 512-byte sectors

Slot Start End Length Description
00: Meta

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How To - Digital Forensic Imaging In VMware ESXi

Paul A. Henry Forensics and Recovery.com Follow me on Twitter

As a follow up to my recent SANS Forensic Blog post "How To - Digital Forensics Copying A VMware VMDK" that provided insight in to making a "GUI tool" based copy of a VMware VMDK, I have put together a How To that addresses creating a forensically sound image of a VMware VMDK on the ESXi console, that is able to provide the "chain of custody" needed in a digital forensics investigation.

Important note: In the simplest of terms a VMDK is an abstraction of a physical disk for a VM contained within a file (VMDK-flat). We are making a bit by bit

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How To - Digital Forensics Copying A VMware VMDK

Having recently seen a number of requests on the security and forensic list servers that I participate in requesting recommendations / procedures for copying the disk (VMDK) for a specific Virtual Machine (VM) within a VMware environment for analysis in an incident response, I put together a quick How To in effort to provide some insight in to a few of the methods that I have used.

The Game Has Clearly Changed With Virtualization

Most often the files associated with a given VM are not stored locally on the physical server running ESX or ESXi and the respective VM. It is important to understand that in order to use many of the more powerful features of VMware such as vMotion and DRS the files for the VM's must reside on shared storage that is reachable from each ESX or ESXi server that needs to interact with it. Hence, when

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Did Las Vegas Police Fumble Critical Digital Forensics in High Profile Shooting Case?

While in a re-certification class at SANS Network Security, a local news story catches my attention. It's a coroner's inquest into the death of Erik Scott, who was shot here in July outside a Costco store by officers of the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police (LVMP) after a store employee spotted Scott's firearm, which he had a permit to carry.

There's limited time while we drink from the SANS fire hose to absorb the day's news events. But I picked up the following from an op-ed piece by Scott's father in the Las Vegas Sun. The dead man's family is harshly critical the investigative process, and not without justification, if William Scott's account is accurate.

The elder Scott says the investigation has been entirely internal, conducted by LVMP. Scott is an aerospace journalist who notes that if an airline pilot has an accident that results in a

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Quick Look - Cellebrite UFED Using Extract Phone Data & File System Dump

It is not the intent of this blog post to be an all-encompassing guide to the forensic analysis of an iPhone. Rather it is a look at some of the tools I use in my practice and how they can be applied to iPhone forensic analysis. That being said lets get to it.

Why would you use the Cellebrite File System Dump instead of the traditional Extract Phone Data ?

If the subject of your forensic analysis is collecting information regarding the telephone such as call logs, phone book, SMS, pictures, video and audio/music then you will find what you need using the standard Cellebrite processing found under "Extract Phone Data". However if you want to do a deep dive in to the file structure, Internet usage or look deep in to the applications that are being used on the device and perhaps run some of your "favorite forensic tools" against it, I highly recommend complimenting your traditional

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