SANS Digital Forensics and Incident Response Blog: Category - Evidence Analysis

Digital Forensics How-To: Memory Analysis with Mandiant Memoryze

Mandiant's Memoryze tool is without question one of the best forensic tools available. It is an incredibly powerful memory analysis suite that should be part of every incident responder's toolkit. It's free, but requires some patience to traverse the learning curve. Memoryze was built by Jamie Butler and Peter Silberman, a couple of hardcore memory / malware analysts that operate on a completely different level than most of us mere mortals. In this post I'll cover how to get started with Memoryze, because if you haven't added memory analysis to your intrusion investigations, there is a whole lot of evil out there that you are missing.

Getting Started

The first step is to go out and download the tool. An important thing to keep in mind is that Memoryze actually consists of two components: Memoryze and Audit Viewer. Each must be downloaded individually from the free tools section of the Mandiant


Digital Forensics: Detecting time stamp manipulation

At approximately 22:50 CDT on 20101029 I responded to an event involving a user who had received an email from a friend with a link to some kid's games. The user said he tried to play the games, but that nothing happened. A few minutes later, the user saw a strange pop up message asking to send an error report about regwin.exe to Microsoft.

I opened a command prompt on the system, ran netstat and saw an established connection to a host on a different network on port 443. The process id belonged to a process named kids_games.exe.

I grabbed a copy of Mandiant's Memoryze and collected a memory image from the system and copied it to my laptop for offline analysis using Audit Viewer.

Audit Viewer gave the kids_games.exe process a very high Malware Rating Index (see Figure 1), so I decided there was probably more

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Solaris Digital Forensics: Part2

This series of articles is a primer on Solaris forensics. As such each article will build upon the last and should be read from start to finish for those new to Unix. Part 1 is available at https://blogs.sans.org/computer-forensics/2010/10/15/solaris-forensics-part-1/.

Reading ls output

Being able to correctly read the ls command's output is critical for moving around the OS and to looking for signs of compromise. As you go through the filesystem, keep in mind you may not be truly seeing an accurate picture of the filesystem. If the machine has a rootkit installed on it, some of the files and directories may be hidden.

In the UNIX filesytem we have some basically defined file types:

  • Regular files
  • Directories
  • Symbolic Links (hard and soft)
  • Device

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Digital Forensics Case Leads: Industrial Controls Forensics, Cracking Crackberries, Mobile Forensics

While most technical and non-technical types focus on servers, desktop, and mobile phones/pads when thinking about security and forensics, an area of growing concern is industrial controls security. This was brought to light in the wake of the Stuxnet worm. The accusations continue to fly, via arm-chair forensics. Was it an attack on Iran? Or maybe an attack against India, since it seems Stuxnet may have knocked out a TV Satellite. Security honcho Bruce Schnier says we may never know.

What is certain is a growing concern over industrial controls security. According to a San Francisco Chronicle story that ran on this week: "... Liam O Murchu, a researcher with the computer security firm Symantec, used a

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Digital Forensics Case Leads: Free tools, Treasure Hunts, Drive-by Attacks and Spying

This week's Case Leads features two free tools from AccessData and Paraben Corporation, a digital (forensics) treasure hunt to test your skills, spying, drive-by (browser) attacks and consequences resulting from Stuxnet.

As always, if you have an interesting item you think should be included in the Digital Forensics Case Leads posts, you can send it to caseleads@sans.org.

Tools:

  • Earlier this month AccessData released a new version of their popular (and free) utility, the FTK Imager. Version 3 has a number of useful features such as the ability to boot forensic images in VMWare and the ability to mount AFF, DD, E01, and S01 image formats as physical devices or logical drive letters. The latest version of the application also supports HFS+, VxFS (Veritas File System), exFAT, EXT4, Microsoft's VHD (Virtual Hard Disk) and compressed and uncompressed DMG

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