SANS Digital Forensics and Incident Response Blog: Category - Evidence Analysis

Digital Forensics Case Leads: Incident Response Hits The Mainstream; Powerful Tech Fighting CP; Acquisition Errors Can Cost Case

Incident Response Lead Story: Why it pays to have incident response in a Wikileaks world. The Wikileaks story is having a ripple effect that shows no sign of abating. As of this writing, according to a spokesperson for PandaSecurity: the following web sites have been attacked in the name of defending the actions of Wikileaks: … Continue reading Digital Forensics Case Leads: Incident Response Hits The Mainstream; Powerful Tech Fighting CP; Acquisition Errors Can Cost Case


Digital Forensics: A Quick Note About Shred

Hal Pomeranz, Deer Run Associates In the Linux/Unix realm we have tools like shred for securely overwriting files before deleting them in order to prevent recovery of the deleted file. If your adversary is sufficiently advanced (or just not lazy), they can obviously use these tools to frustrate your forensic investigation. Previously, I had thought … Continue reading Digital Forensics: A Quick Note About Shred


Paraben Forensic Conference Report: iPhone Forensics - Tools and Tips From The Trenches

One of the training classes with high attendance at the Paraben Forensic Innovations Conference this week in Park City, Utah, was the Apple iOS Forensics Bootcamp. Apple's iOS is the operating system that powers the Apple iPhone, iPod Touch, the iPad, and the Apple iTV device. With the exploding popularity of these devices (well, except for the iTV), Law Enforcement, corporate investigators, and other forensic professionals are looking to learn more about this platform.

The iOS Forensics Bootcamp was instructed by Ben Lemere of Basis Technologies. Lemere has worked in forensics for The Feds, and the private sector. The focus of the bootcamp was mostly on iPhone forensics, although many of the principals apply to the other devices. Ben uses an excellent tool for conducting iOS forensic analysis, and provided

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Digital Forensics How-To: Memory Analysis with Mandiant Memoryze

Mandiant's Memoryze tool is without question one of the best forensic tools available. It is an incredibly powerful memory analysis suite that should be part of every incident responder's toolkit. It's free, but requires some patience to traverse the learning curve. Memoryze was built by Jamie Butler and Peter Silberman, a couple of hardcore memory / malware analysts that operate on a completely different level than most of us mere mortals. In this post I'll cover how to get started with Memoryze, because if you haven't added memory analysis to your intrusion investigations, there is a whole lot of evil out there that you are missing.

Getting Started

The first step is to go out and download the tool. An important thing to keep in mind is that Memoryze actually consists of two components: Memoryze and Audit Viewer. Each must be downloaded individually from the free tools section of the Mandiant


Digital Forensics: Detecting time stamp manipulation

At approximately 22:50 CDT on 20101029 I responded to an event involving a user who had received an email from a friend with a link to some kid's games. The user said he tried to play the games, but that nothing happened. A few minutes later, the user saw a strange pop up message asking to send an error report about regwin.exe to Microsoft.

I opened a command prompt on the system, ran netstat and saw an established connection to a host on a different network on port 443. The process id belonged to a process named kids_games.exe.

I grabbed a copy of Mandiant's Memoryze and collected a memory image from the system and copied it to my laptop for offline analysis using Audit Viewer.

Audit Viewer gave the kids_games.exe process a very high Malware Rating Index (see Figure 1), so I decided there was probably more

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