SANS Digital Forensics and Incident Response Blog: Category - Evidence Analysis

Solaris Digital Forensics: Part2

This series of articles is a primer on Solaris forensics. As such each article will build upon the last and should be read from start to finish for those new to Unix. Part 1 is available at https://blogs.sans.org/computer-forensics/2010/10/15/solaris-forensics-part-1/.

Reading ls output

Being able to correctly read the ls command's output is critical for moving around the OS and to looking for signs of compromise. As you go through the filesystem, keep in mind you may not be truly seeing an accurate picture of the filesystem. If the machine has a rootkit installed on it, some of the files and directories may be hidden.

In the UNIX filesytem we have some basically defined file types:

  • Regular files
  • Directories
  • Symbolic Links (hard and soft)
  • Device

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Digital Forensics Case Leads: Industrial Controls Forensics, Cracking Crackberries, Mobile Forensics

While most technical and non-technical types focus on servers, desktop, and mobile phones/pads when thinking about security and forensics, an area of growing concern is industrial controls security. This was brought to light in the wake of the Stuxnet worm. The accusations continue to fly, via arm-chair forensics. Was it an attack on Iran? Or maybe an attack against India, since it seems Stuxnet may have knocked out a TV Satellite. Security honcho Bruce Schnier says we may never know.

What is certain is a growing concern over industrial controls security. According to a San Francisco Chronicle story that ran on this week: "... Liam O Murchu, a researcher with the computer security firm Symantec, used a

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Digital Forensics Case Leads: Free tools, Treasure Hunts, Drive-by Attacks and Spying

This week's Case Leads features two free tools from AccessData and Paraben Corporation, a digital (forensics) treasure hunt to test your skills, spying, drive-by (browser) attacks and consequences resulting from Stuxnet.

As always, if you have an interesting item you think should be included in the Digital Forensics Case Leads posts, you can send it to caseleads@sans.org.

Tools:

  • Earlier this month AccessData released a new version of their popular (and free) utility, the FTK Imager. Version 3 has a number of useful features such as the ability to boot forensic images in VMWare and the ability to mount AFF, DD, E01, and S01 image formats as physical devices or logical drive letters. The latest version of the application also supports HFS+, VxFS (Veritas File System), exFAT, EXT4, Microsoft's VHD (Virtual Hard Disk) and compressed and uncompressed DMG

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Images and dm-crypt and LVM2... Oh my!

Hal Pomeranz, Deer Run Associates

Disk layouts using the Linux Logical Volume Manager (LVM2) are increasingly becoming the norm for new Linux installs. And very often the physical volume used by LVM2 has been encrypted via dm-crypt. A recent email from a Sec508 student asking for a procedure for mounting these images prompted me to codify this information into a blog posting.

Investigating the Image

When initially presented with the image, you may not know whether LVM2 or dm-crypt has been employed. So let's start from scratch:

# md5sum sda.dd
f4c7a8d54b9b0b0b73ec03ef4cf52f42 sda.dd
# mmls -t dos sda.dd
DOS Partition Table
Offset Sector: 0
Units are in 512-byte sectors

Slot Start End Length Description
00: Meta

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How To - Digital Forensic Imaging In VMware ESXi

Paul A. Henry Forensics and Recovery.com Follow me on Twitter

As a follow up to my recent SANS Forensic Blog post "How To - Digital Forensics Copying A VMware VMDK" that provided insight in to making a "GUI tool" based copy of a VMware VMDK, I have put together a How To that addresses creating a forensically sound image of a VMware VMDK on the ESXi console, that is able to provide the "chain of custody" needed in a digital forensics investigation.

Important note: In the simplest of terms a VMDK is an abstraction of a physical disk for a VM contained within a file (VMDK-flat). We are making a bit by bit

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