SANS Digital Forensics and Incident Response Blog: Category - Evidence Analysis

Turning RegRipper into WindowsRipper

Harlan Carvey has given us a great tool inRegRipper andit's undeniable that many examiners have found it to be a useful addition to their toolbox. RegRipper has a very specific purpose - parse the Windows registry. With some modification, we can turn RegRipper into WindowsRipper, an extremely powerful Windows triage tool. Using WindowsRipper we can parse much more than just the registry.

Adam James, a coworker who did the coding for this project, and I took a look at RegRipper and decided it could be morphed nicely into an amazing triage tool. The first thing Adam did wasmodify RegRipper to work against a mounted drive. You can read his explanation in the previous post or simply know that his code allows RegRipper to look at a mounted drive, find the Windows

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Digital Forensics Case Leads: New RegRipper Feature, An Open Letter to Judges, the DFRWS Challenge and How Not to Seize Smart Phones

This week's installment of Digital Forensics Case Leads features a couple of tools useful for reviewing Window's systems. There is an announcement about a new feature of RegRipper and we have an open letter to the court on the use of neutral digital forensic examiners. The 2010 DFRWS Challenge is underway and law enforcement experiences the remote wiping feature of smart phones.

Keep those suggestions and topics for Digital Forensics Case Leads coming to caseleads at sans.org!

Tools:

  • Miss Identify is a cross-platform tool developed by Jesse Kornblum that identifies mislabeled Window's executables. A mislabeled executable is any executable without an executable extension of exe, dll, com, sys, cpl, hxs, hxi, olb, rll, or tlb.
  • If you've ever lost a software application key, (or need to audit installed software) the

Timestamped Registry & NTFS Artifacts from Unallocated Space

Frequently, while following up a Windows investigation, I will add certain filenames or other string values to my case wordlist and subsequently find these strings embedded in binary data of one type or another in unallocated space. Close examination of the surrounding data structures has shown that these are often old MFT entries, INDX structures, or registry keys or values. The thing that makes these things very interesting from a forensic perspective is that all of them but registry values incorporate Windows timestamps. (All timestamps referenced in this article are 64bit Windows filetime values.) Even registry values often follow closely after their parent keys in the registry, which do have associated timestamps. Once I'd noticed these key facts, it occurred to me that it would be useful to use the timestamp values to work backward to other associated data, and hence the genesis of this

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Digital Forensic Case Leads: Malware hunting

Incident responders and digital forensics investigators are on the front-lines in the battle against malware. We need good intelligence for tracking its origins and command and control structures. This intelligence can help us limit malware's access to our networks and help us find it. When we do find it, we need good tools for eradicating it. For this week's Case Leads, I've been looking into some resources and tools that can aid in these efforts.
Tools:

  • First up, a new, to me, malware removal tool called Malwarebytes. As I said, it's new to me, and I've only done a little playing around in the lab, but I've been told by others that it works great. I'm blocking out some time to delve into the tool more extensively and will have more to say about it then.
  • Two sites that provide lists of sites known to be distributing malware, http://www.malwaredomains.com/

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Digital Forensics Case Leads: The SIFT Workstation 2.0 Edition

Rob Lee recently brought us version 2.0 of the SANS Investigative Forensics Toolkit (SIFT), Into the Boxes Issue 0x1 was released, along with some interesting new tools by Harlan Carvey, and the New Jersey Supreme Court makes a ruling that could have significant impact on employer policies and employee expectations of privacy. Those in or near the Toronto area should also check out SANS Computer Forensic Essentials taught by SANS Computer Forensics blog contributor Chad Tilbury. There's a lot of good stuff linked below, so explore and enjoy. And, as always, thanks to all who make such excellent information and tools available to the community.

Tools:

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