SANS Digital Forensics and Incident Response Blog: Category - Evidence Analysis

PTK HASH SET MANAGER

Both the free version and the commercial version of the PTK project, equipped with an appliance, are constantly developing. PTK is now able to thoroughly and accurately manage the hash libraries thus rendering investigation processes faster and easier. At the moment, PTK is working with hash libraries in Haskeeper format or is importing only those hash values known to the investigator. PTK doesn't just create hash sets checking them as GOOD or BAD but offers the possibility to create new personalized sets and chooses, given the case, the most appropriate set for the lookup operation. The screenshot below shows how it is possible to create three different hash sets (such as for example INFECTED, SYSTEM, STOLEN )

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Extracting VB Macro Code from Malicious MS Office Documents

An incident responder or forensic investigator should be prepared to examine potentially-malicious document files, which may be located on the compromised system or discovered in email, web, or other network streams. After all, embedding malicious code into documents, such as Excel spreadsheets or Adobe Acrobat PDF files is quite effective at bypassing perimeter defenses. This note deals with one such scenario, focusing on how to extract Visual Basic (VB) macro code that may be embedded in malicious Microsoft Office files. I will discuss how to extract macros from both legacy binary Office files (.doc, .xls, .ppt), as well as modern XML-based Office formats that support macros (such as .docm, .xlsm, .pptm). As you'll see, OfficeMalScanner will be my tool of choice for getting the job

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Facebook Memory Forensics

OK, like everyone I joined facebook just to get updates on my high school reunion. (Who knew you could also use it as a possible alibi.)

But then, after writing pdgmail and pdymail and seeing all the neat personal information in facebook...tada pdfbook! Memory parsing to grab facebook info.

Like it's predecessors pdgmail and pdymail, I'm following the simple construct that memory strings are easy to get to and yield a treasure of information given today's


Helix 3 Pro: First Impressions

I have used several versions of Helix over the recent years. I enjoy the tool set and recommend it to forensics colleagues, sysadmins, and even family members.

Quite a substantial ruckus was raised this year when e-fense announced that Helix 3 would no longer be free to download. Instead, would-be users must pay to register as a forum user to get access to Helix 3 Pro updates for a year.

I took the plunge and

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Mounting Images Using Alternate Superblocks (Follow-Up)

Hal Pomeranz, Deer Run Associates

Several months ago, I blogged about using alternate superblocks to fake out the ext3 drivers so you could mount file system images read-only, even if they were needing journal recovery. However, due to recent changes in the ext file system driver the method I describe in my posting is no longer sufficient. Happily, there's a quick work-around.

Let's try the solution from the end of my previous posting under a more recent Linux kernel:

# mount -o loop,ro,sb=131072 dev_sda2.dd /mnt
mount: wrong fs type, bad option, bad superblock on /dev/loop0,
missing codepage or helper program, or other error
In some cases useful info is

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