SANS Digital Forensics and Incident Response Blog: Category - Evidence Analysis

A big FAT lie

In the last post in our quest to restore the tampered FAT file system to its untainted state, we rebuilt the cluster chain in the File Allocation Table so we could copy out the file from the mounted file system. Let's move on to the next file in our image.fls ouput from usbkey.img

Let's see about "cover page.jpg." For starters, let's copy the file out of the mounted file system:


MIAT for Symbian & Windows Mobile Forensics

I recently became interested in mobile device forensics. This area covers a lot of ground, but a particularly interesting subfield is the forensics of Windows Mobile. As far as I was able to discover, not much has been written about this, which makes it perfect for a blog posting.

After a significant amount of Google research, I found a paper presented at the 2008 DFRWS conference. In it, the authors discuss a Mobile Internal Acquisition Tool, MIAT. They created this tool for extracting files from Smartphones running Symbian or Windows Mobile, and saving them to removable media. Another reference to the same work is presented here.

I was unable to locate a download site for the tool, so I contacted one of the presenters, Alessandro Distefano, as

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Rebuilding FAT cluster chains

For those reading this entry and not familiar with the others in the series, a brief bit of background is in order. This post is the fourth in a series about the FAT file system. We have a disk image taken from a suspect's USB key, but some of the metadata has been modified to make getting at the evidence more difficult, though only slightly. We're attempting to undo the modifications our suspect has made and restore the image to its unaltered state.

I did a little digging over the weekend and discovered a couple links that may be of interest to those playing along at home. First, Mike Murr, of Code-X Technologies and Forensicblog.org, has covered some aspects concerning our image on his blog


FAT Directory Entry repair

This is the third installment in a series of posts about FAT file systems. We're using the usbkey.img file that's given to students of SANS Sec. 508. The image has been altered by the suspect. Our goal is to return it to it's unaltered state.

In the second post, we gathered some information about the files on the image and using a hex editor took a look at the two metadata structures for FAT file systems, the FAT Directory Entry and the


Top 7 ways investigators catch criminals using Mobile Device Forensics

Modern day mobile devices are a double-edged sword, creating new security risks while providing valuable sources of evidence for digital forensic investigators. Their ever expanding capabilities make mobile devices more like personal computers that accompany us as we navigate the world. Digital forensic investigators can use information stored on and generated by mobile devices to reconstruct our movements, communications, and other personal details.

If you need to extract information from cell phones, smart phones, and other mobile devices, or are concerned about the security of data on such devices, here are some important things you should know.

Bypassing Security Codes: Digital forensic investigators can extract the security code from some locked mobile devices using specialized tools. The screenshot below

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