SANS Digital Forensics and Incident Response Blog: Category - Evidence Analysis

Perl-Fu: Regexp log file processing

Remember that with Perl the key benefit is the ability to easily implement almost any kind of input/output processing system one might need or conceive, without the need for a lot of code or time in development. When you are faced with massive amounts of data and a small amount of analytical time, this agility is critical. I will not be teaching regular expression syntax but there are countless primers and resources on the web for this, and they almost universally apply to languages/interpreters other than Perl, including our favorite command line tool, grep. Consider the following code:

#!/usr/bin/perl
# UserSplit.pl
# Creates user-specific files from a single log file based on the field "User="
$logfile = $ARGV[0];
open(LOG, "

Using mind maps in forensics

by Jeff Bryner

I've been playing with mind mapping software lately, mostly using the wonderfully open source freemind.I'm definitely not the first one to consider using this for forensic analysis, but hopefully I can help spread the meme and help us all organize our thoughts.

Just for fun, here's a sample starting point for a fake embezzlement case if you've not seen a mind map before:
basic mind map

I've posted it here in case it's easier to start

...


Strings, Strings, Are Wonderful Things

One of the basics of doing forensics involves gathering the ASCII and Unicode strings in the file system and searching for keywords. Using Linux we can gather the strings for both ASCII and Unicode using the strings command.

To Gather the ASCII Strings

# strings -td /dev/sdb > sdb.ascii

Note: The -td in the above line tells strings to print the offset in decimal for the line.

To Gather the Unicode Strings

# strings -td -el /dev/sdb > sdb.unicode

Note: The -el option will have the strings command handle 16-bit little endian encoding. Strings can handle other types of encoding such as 32-bit big/little endian. See the man page on strings and the -e option.

Below is a sample output from the command:

192301896     
192301972 This field is deprecated. Deprecated components of Microsoft

... Continue reading Strings, Strings, Are Wonderful Things


Forensics and Perl-Fu: Reducing Data and Cleaning Up Log Files

By: Mike Worman

Perl's simplicity and its raw power may seem paradoxical but this is simply a clever ruse. There is a lot going on behind the scenes when using Perl, which has often been described as the scripting language that attempts to figure out exactly what the developer wants in as little code as possible''and it usually succeeds. Even when it doesn't, another possible approach is usually immediately apparent. Never forget the Perl motto: TIMTOWTDI!


Data recovery with Hex Editor and RegEx

by Quinn Shamblin

In my previous postabout recovering mp3 data from a corrupted chip, I describe a data recovery challenge that I could not solve using FTK, Foremost or Lazarus. It turned out that Regular Expressionswere my answer. But how best to run regex-based data extractionagainst a forensic image when there might be hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of individual matching frames?

Hex Editor Neowas exactly what I needed. It has a few unique features that really

...