SANS Digital Forensics and Incident Response Blog: Category - Memory Analysis

Digital Forensics How-To: Memory Analysis with Mandiant Memoryze

Mandiant's Memoryze tool is without question one of the best forensic tools available. It is an incredibly powerful memory analysis suite that should be part of every incident responder's toolkit. It's free, but requires some patience to traverse the learning curve. Memoryze was built by Jamie Butler and Peter Silberman, a couple of hardcore memory / malware analysts that operate on a completely different level than most of us mere mortals. In this post I'll cover how to get started with Memoryze, because if you haven't added memory analysis to your intrusion investigations, there is a whole lot of evil out there that you are missing.

Getting Started

The first step is to go out and download the tool. An important thing to keep in mind is that Memoryze actually consists of two components: Memoryze and Audit Viewer. Each must be downloaded individually from the free tools section of the Mandiant


Digital Forensics Case Leads: Free tools, Treasure Hunts, Drive-by Attacks and Spying

This week's Case Leads features two free tools from AccessData and Paraben Corporation, a digital (forensics) treasure hunt to test your skills, spying, drive-by (browser) attacks and consequences resulting from Stuxnet.

As always, if you have an interesting item you think should be included in the Digital Forensics Case Leads posts, you can send it to caseleads@sans.org.

Tools:

  • Earlier this month AccessData released a new version of their popular (and free) utility, the FTK Imager. Version 3 has a number of useful features such as the ability to boot forensic images in VMWare and the ability to mount AFF, DD, E01, and S01 image formats as physical devices or logical drive letters. The latest version of the application also supports HFS+, VxFS (Veritas File System), exFAT, EXT4, Microsoft's VHD (Virtual Hard Disk) and compressed and uncompressed DMG

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3 Phases of Malware Analysis: Behavioral, Code, and Memory Forensics

When discussing malware analysis, I've always referred to 2 main phases of the process: behavioral analysis and code analysis. It's time to add a third major component: memory analysis.

Here's a brief outline of each phase:

  • Behavioral analysis examines the malware specimen's interactions with its environment: the file system, the registry (if on Windows), the network, as well as other processes and OS components. As the malware investigator notices interesting behavioral characteristics, he modifies the laboratory environment to evoke newcharacteristics. To perform this work, theinvestigatortypically infects the isolated system while having the necessary monitoring tools observe the specimen's execution. Some of the free tools that can help in this analysis phase are Process Monitor,

How To - Digital Forensic Imaging In VMware ESXi

Paul A. Henry Forensics and Recovery.com Follow me on Twitter

As a follow up to my recent SANS Forensic Blog post "How To - Digital Forensics Copying A VMware VMDK" that provided insight in to making a "GUI tool" based copy of a VMware VMDK, I have put together a How To that addresses creating a forensically sound image of a VMware VMDK on the ESXi console, that is able to provide the "chain of custody" needed in a digital forensics investigation.

Important note: In the simplest of terms a VMDK is an abstraction of a physical disk for a VM contained within a file (VMDK-flat). We are making a bit by bit

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Review: Access Data Forensic Toolkit (FTK) Version 3 — Part 2

Welcome to part two of my FTK v3 review. If you have not read the first post, it can be found here. Forensic suites are notoriously difficult to review because of the sheer number of features they include. We are lucky within the computer forensic community to have multiple vendors operating in a highly competitive environment. As such, the core forensic suites continue to add functionality. I have chosen to highlight a few of the new(er) features within Access Data's Forensic Toolkit (FTK). I interact with a lot of folks who are building forensic capabilities within their organizations, often with a limited budget. With the new additions to FTK, I find myself recommending it more and more. For the typical forensic shop it really does have a lot of bang

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