SANS Digital Forensics and Incident Response Blog: Category - Reporting

Digital Forensic Case Leads: Anon Strikes Again, and Again. Groupon Litigation Threats. DarkMarket Motivations Revealed. The Tutu Has Been Donned

This week's Digital Forensic Case Leads is chock full of forensics nuggets. Links to great forensics tools for encryption detection and memory extraction, plus a how-to for breaking/auditing the OS X Keychain. You will also find an analysis of the Samsung v. Apple patent case from a digital forensics perspective, with IP Attorney Ben Langlotz. … Continue reading Digital Forensic Case Leads: Anon Strikes Again, and Again. Groupon Litigation Threats. DarkMarket Motivations Revealed. The Tutu Has Been Donned


Digital Forensics Case Leads: Your Password Is Out There, again...

Data breaches at LinkedIn, eHarmony, and Last.fm exposed millions of account passwords, and probably other data that the attackers haven't made public. also a wealth of interesting new and updated tools. Among these are HexDive, SquirrelGripper, ShadowKit, and a Report Writing cheat sheet from Girl,Unallocated. Also worthy of particular note is Corey Harrell's Compromise Root Cause Analysis Model Continue reading Digital Forensics Case Leads: Your Password Is Out There, again...


New version of Nmap, 60TB hard drives on the way, attacker trends, & a dissected web attack

This week's edition of Case Leads features updates to a popular network scanning tool and another application which may be useful in gaining access to encrypted documents. We also have an article detailing a recent attack against a website and a couple of papers that look at attack trends. There's news that hard drives could … Continue reading New version of Nmap, 60TB hard drives on the way, attacker trends, & a dissected web attack


Investigators: How to Write a Report and Store Digital Evidence

A wise investigator assumes an attitude of professionally skepticism. She recognizes that any piece of evidence may not be what it seems to be, and might in the future be interpreted in a different way or be refuted by other evidence.

Consider for example one of the most famous and thorough investigations in American history. The official investigation of the 1970 shooting of Kent State students by national guardsmen concluded that a certain Terry Norman (paid FBI informant) played no role in the shooting. However, forty years later a previously-unknown tape recording of the events has surfaced, and a forensic analysis of the recording shows that someone fired a .38-caliber pistol four times, shortly before the guardsmen opened fire. Norman was known to have brandished such a pistol at that place and time. It appears that

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Quick Look - Cellebrite UFED Using Extract Phone Data & File System Dump

It is not the intent of this blog post to be an all-encompassing guide to the forensic analysis of an iPhone. Rather it is a look at some of the tools I use in my practice and how they can be applied to iPhone forensic analysis. That being said lets get to it.

Why would you use the Cellebrite File System Dump instead of the traditional Extract Phone Data ?

If the subject of your forensic analysis is collecting information regarding the telephone such as call logs, phone book, SMS, pictures, video and audio/music then you will find what you need using the standard Cellebrite processing found under "Extract Phone Data". However if you want to do a deep dive in to the file structure, Internet usage or look deep in to the applications that are being used on the device and perhaps run some of your "favorite forensic tools" against it, I highly recommend complimenting your traditional

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