SANS Digital Forensics and Incident Response Blog: Tag - DefCon

Case Leads: A Forensicator's take on BlackHat/DefCon/BSides

It's been a busy time in digital forensics and incident response (DFIR). Every summer, for over 20 years, infosec and forensicators and old school hackers have gathered in Las Vegas. A mixture of very deep tech talks, trainings, and technology oriented distractions "flood the zone" in Las Vegas. Close to 15-20,000 people were in Las … Continue reading Case Leads: A Forensicator's take on BlackHat/DefCon/BSides


Digital Forensics Case Leads: Viva Las Vegas Forensics at BlackHat, SecurityBSidesLV, and DefCon

The 103 degree heat hits you in the face like a baseball bat. Some people say that 103 degrees (in the shade) is "no big deal", because, as they continue, "it's a dry heat." Yea, well, my oven is a dry heat, and I don't stick my head in it. But that is exactly the … Continue reading Digital Forensics Case Leads: Viva Las Vegas Forensics at BlackHat, SecurityBSidesLV, and DefCon


Digital Forensics Case Leads Aug 5, 2010: Decon 18 and more

The DefCon conference ended on Sunday, and this year's edition of the "World's Largest Hacker Conference" (as many call it) didn't disappoint. We have news and coverage from a forensic and incident response viewpoint, including news about the Wikileaks incident you might not have seen elsewhere. Blackberry is getting hammered on security, well that's what many headlines read. We have a different take. Web tracking and privacy is getting a higher profile, what are the forensic implications? Many home and business networks are "protected" by popular router/firewalls for sale at big box electronics stores. New research reveals breach mechanisms that have forensic and incident response implications. The truth slowly is revealed, along with peoples' private parts, about images from the Whole Body Scanners. And, in the Levity Section: DefCon18 Social engineering contest a hit at DefCon.

Good Reads / Good Audio:

  • "I know what happened with

... Continue reading Digital Forensics Case Leads Aug 5, 2010: Decon 18 and more


Nevada bill would make some security research a felony

by Ira Victor

The 75th Session of Nevada Legislature is taking up a new bill - SB125 - that, if enacted into law as introduced to committee, could make it illegal for information security researchers to do work that shows the vulnerabilities in many types of RFID systems. There are important security research, criminal issues, and some forensic matters related to this bill.

The bill would make it a class C felony (up to 5 years in prison, up to a $10,000 fine) to skim personally identifiable information (PII) from another person's RFID enabled ID or other document, without that person's prior knowledge.