SANS Digital Forensics and Incident Response Blog: Tag - Reporting

Digital Forensics Case Leads: Your Password Is Out There, again...

Data breaches at LinkedIn, eHarmony, and Last.fm exposed millions of account passwords, and probably other data that the attackers haven't made public. also a wealth of interesting new and updated tools. Among these are HexDive, SquirrelGripper, ShadowKit, and a Report Writing cheat sheet from Girl,Unallocated. Also worthy of particular note is Corey Harrell's Compromise Root Cause Analysis Model Continue reading Digital Forensics Case Leads: Your Password Is Out There, again...


Investigators: How to Write a Report and Store Digital Evidence

A wise investigator assumes an attitude of professionally skepticism. She recognizes that any piece of evidence may not be what it seems to be, and might in the future be interpreted in a different way or be refuted by other evidence.

Consider for example one of the most famous and thorough investigations in American history. The official investigation of the 1970 shooting of Kent State students by national guardsmen concluded that a certain Terry Norman (paid FBI informant) played no role in the shooting. However, forty years later a previously-unknown tape recording of the events has surfaced, and a forensic analysis of the recording shows that someone fired a .38-caliber pistol four times, shortly before the guardsmen opened fire. Norman was known to have brandished such a pistol at that place and time. It appears that

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Intro to Report Writing for Digital Forensics

So you've just completed your forensic examination and found that forensic gem or smoking gun in your case, so how do you proceed? Depending on where you fall as a forensicator (e.g., law enforcement, intelligence, criminal defense work, incident response, e-discovery) you will have to report your findings. Foremost, find out what type of work product you are going to be required to produce to the client, attorney, etc. This will be your guide for completing your report. While the report writing part of the digital forensic examination process is not as fun as the forensic analysis, it is a very important link in the chain as Dave Hull summed it up here in a tweet.

As digital forensic examiners/analysts, we must report and present our findings on a very technical discipline in a simplistic manner. That may be to a supervisor, client, attorney, etc. or even to a judge and jury who will read and interpret your

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Digital Forensics Reporting: CaseNotes Walkthrough/Review

One important aspect of Digital Forensics is reporting. There are many reasons for this. One is to keep track of work that you have done during analysis. Another is if you are working on a case and it ends up getting reassigned to another examiner, they can look over your notes and will know what you've done, how you've done it, when you've done it and what the results were up to that point of transfer. The most important reason though, is for your appearance in court to testify on a case. Now as most of us know, there are many cases that never make it to trial or end up getting settled out of court. That is no excuse to be lax in your reporting. Each case should be treated like it will go the distance.

With that said, I, like most, have taken my notes by hand. I find that handwritten notes tend to become sloppy in the long run. While taking notes, if you run out of room and don't have another clean sheet of paper handy to continue you may end up writing in

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Trusting Your Tools

"A trusted tool is one that you understand what it does"- Chris Pogue

I recently heard Chris make that statement during his "Sniper Forensics" presentation at the 2010 SANS Forensics & Incident Response Summit. It was that statement that inspired me to put together this post. As digital forensic examiners, we rely on various applications/programs (tools) to aid us during our investigations. I want to take Chris' statement and flesh it out a bit''

"A trusted tool is one that you understand what it does, where it came from, what flaws it has and what results it gives you."

This post is aimed at those that are new to digital forensics, but will also help those that may not have been given a push in the right direction or those that are experienced who might have lost their way. So let's get started.

There may be a tool you are interested in using that you heard about somewhere. Let's face it, forensic examiners need tools to assist them with their

... Continue reading Trusting Your Tools