SANS Digital Forensics and Incident Response Blog: Tag - timeline

Digital Forensic SIFTing: SUPER Timeline Creation using log2timeline

This is a series of blog articles that utilize the SIFT Workstation. The free SIFT workstation, can match any modern forensic tool suite, is also directly featured and taught in SANS' Advanced Computer Forensic Analysis and Incident Response course (FOR 508). SIFT demonstrates that advanced investigations and responding to intrusions can be accomplished using cutting-edge … Continue reading Digital Forensic SIFTing: SUPER Timeline Creation using log2timeline


SIFT Workstation 2.12 Release and ChangeLog

Due to several issues with libewf and minor bugs found in log2timeline and log2timline-sift, we have released a new version of the SIFT Workstation. This is not a major release, but I did have time to go and refresh many packages built in it. The next release will update the ubuntu backend and be a … Continue reading SIFT Workstation 2.12 Release and ChangeLog


Digital Forensics: Detecting time stamp manipulation

At approximately 22:50 CDT on 20101029 I responded to an event involving a user who had received an email from a friend with a link to some kid's games. The user said he tried to play the games, but that nothing happened. A few minutes later, the user saw a strange pop up message asking to send an error report about regwin.exe to Microsoft.

I opened a command prompt on the system, ran netstat and saw an established connection to a host on a different network on port 443. The process id belonged to a process named kids_games.exe.

I grabbed a copy of Mandiant's Memoryze and collected a memory image from the system and copied it to my laptop for offline analysis using Audit Viewer.

Audit Viewer gave the kids_games.exe process a very high Malware Rating Index (see Figure 1), so I decided there was probably more

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Artifact Timeline Creation and Analysis - part 2

In the last post I talked about the tool log2timeline, and mentioned a hypothetical case that we are working on. Let's explore in further detail how we can use the tool to assist us in our analysis.

How do we go about collecting all the data that we need for the case? In this case we know that the we were called to investigate the case only hours after the alleged policy violation, so timeline can be a very valuable source. Therefore we decide to construct a timeline, using artifacts found in the system to start our investigation, so that we can examine the evidence with respect to time. By doing that we both get a better picture of the events that occured as well as to possibly lead us to other artifacts that we need to examine closer using other tools and techniques.

To begin with you start by imaging the drive. You take an image of the C drive (first partition) and start working

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Artifact Timeline Creation and Analysis - Tool Release: log2timeline

Using timeline analysis during investigations can be extremely useful yet it sometimes misses important events that are stored inside files on the suspect system (log files, OS artifacts). By solely depending on traditional filesystem timeline you may miss some context that is necessary to get a complete picture of what really happened. So to get "the big picture", or a complete and accurate description we need to dig deeper and incorporate information found inside artifacts or log files into our timeline analysis. These artifacts or log files could reside on the suspect system itself or in another device, such as a firewall or a proxy (or any other device that logs down information that might be relevant to the investigation).

Unfortunately there are few tools out there that can parse and produce body files from the various artifacts found on different operating systems to include with the traditional filesystem analysis. A version of mactime first appeared in The

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